Drabble Classics

Welcome to  my new series of drabbles called 'Drabble Classics', in this series I will be celebrating classic books in drabble form.


Paradise Lost

Lucifer’s pride sparked rebellion against God and by the Messiah’s might he was cast far from Heaven’s light. Renamed Satan he declared that to rule in Hell suited better than to serve in Heaven.

With envious eyes he watched creation and he beheld two beautiful creatures, clothed only in their innocence and bathed in God’s love.

In serpent form he sneaked into the garden and deceived the maiden, convincing Eve to eat the forbidden fruit. Loyal Adam’s despaired, yet still joined his wife in sin. From their fall we would wait for the Messiah’s return to restore a paradise lost.


The Divine Comedy

On Good Friday ‘s eve I am assailed by three beasts in a wood black with sin, ahead I see a mountain, haloed with promised salvation. Through inferno’s circles Virgil’s wisdom leads me through punishments artfully poetic.

Up the mountain created by Satan’s fall we climb. On this holy day of Christ’s resurrection we pass through the terraces, one for each of the sins most deadly.

Finally into paradise I rise and greeted by Beatrice, my guide through the spheres of the cosmos. In the final sphere I understand God’s love, a love so complete that it moves the stars.



The Tragical History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus

Low born, yet studious Faustus earned his fame and his doctorate. Through his wisdom his knowledge became keen and admired, but he wished to know all, to know beyond what mortal man should ever comprehend.

Through the darkest necromancy he agreed a pact for twenty four years of life confirmed and the devil Mephistopheles his to command. Witnessed by Lucifer and with his own blood he signed the deal and the divine warning ignored.

His wisdom now abandoned, he squandered his vast power in trivial concern. One last warning to repent he ignored and his soul tasted flame for evermore.


Beowulf

Three great battles are sung of Beowulf’s life, the first in the hall of King Hroðgar where the celebrations angered Grendel who slew many warriors within.

Beowulf wrestled the fell creature and tore off the creature’s arm. This caused his second battle, now against Grendel’s mother. They fought in her lair under the lake and with a magic sword he beheaded her.

King Beowulf’s final battle was against a dragon enraged by a theft from its horde. All but loyal Wiglaf abandoned him and together they slew the dragon, but Beowulf was mortally wounded and buried with the cursed treasure.



Dracula

To Count Dracula’s castle Jonathan Harker travelled where he advised the Count and was then condemned to the company of his undead brides.

In London the Count arrived and stalked Jonathan’s fiancée Mina and her friend Lucy whom he turned into a vampire. The learned Van Helsing revealed the secrets of nosferatu and with their friends decapitated Lucy thus ending her curse.


The War of the Worlds

From Mars the invaders came, I approached the site alongside a crowd. They were incinerated by the heat ray and the few survivors fled.

A giant tripod was constructed and left the pit, London’s defences collapsed and a mass exodus began. I purchased tickets to escape by sea, but war machines arrived. The Thunder Child’s sacrifice enabled my wife to escape on the steamer.

Gustave Doré's illustration of the poem's conclusion.

The Raven

While reading forgotten lore to escape the loss of Lenore I heard a rap at my door. Another at the window and I admitted the raven and upon Pallas’s bust it perched.

To my surprise the bird spoke, but knew only one word. I’m certain that it’ll desert me as others had, it said ‘nevermore’.

I reasoned that I could forget Lenore, the raven stated ‘nevermore’.

So I asked whether I’ll see her again and received the same infernal reply. I cursed it back to Hell, but it’s my soul trapped in the raven’s shadow and will be lifted nevermore.

2 comments:

  1. I enjoyed these very much, espcially Paradise Lost. Thanks for posting them.

    ReplyDelete

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